Category Archives: Tillie our farm dog

pure joy

 

Pure joy is being in Sandy Mush with snow all around.  Sledding, hiking, enjoying hot cocoa by the wood stove.  Pure joy.

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A Winter Composition of the Farm

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I have always loved the pauses in between.

Soup, Salads and Sautés

I love being a part of providing healthy and scrumptious food to people, and it makes all the hard work worth it when our farm families share their enjoyment of the freshly harvested veggies.   Here are a few of the various ways they have been enjoying the veggies.

*Hardy recommends these two ways to enjoy greens; both recipes from Epicurious.com:

Sauteed Swiss Chard with Onions
3 pound green Swiss chard (about 2 large bunches)
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 medium onions, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

Cut stems and center ribs from chard, discarding any tough portions, then cut stems and ribs crosswise into 2-inch pieces. Stack chard leaves and roll up lengthwise into cylinders. Cut cylinders crosswise to make 1-inch-wide strips.
Heat oil and butter in a large heavy pot over medium heat until foam subsides, then cook onions and garlic with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper, covered, stirring occasionally, until onions begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Add chard stems and ribs, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until stems are just tender, about 10 minutes. Add chard leaves in batches, stirring until wilted before adding next batch, and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until tender, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a serving bowl.

Cooks’ notes:· Chard can be washed, dried, and cut 2 days ahead and chilled in sealed bags lined with dampened paper towels.

· Chard can be cooked 4 hours ahead and reheated over low heat on stove or in a microwave oven.
Gourmet
November 2007
by Gina Marie Miraglia Eriquez

Spinach Salad with Grilled Red Onion and Tahini Vinaigrette (Hardy loves this Tahini Vinaigrette and substituted Kale for the spinach.)


Vinaigrette  
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
3 tablespoons tahini (sesame seedpaste)
2 tablespoons coarse-grained mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1 small garlic clove, minced
3/4 vegetable oil

Salad
2 large red onions

12 cups (packed) baby spinach,trimmed
10 large radicchio leaves

For Vinaigrette: Combine all ingredients except oil in blender and blend well. Gradually blend in oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

For Salad: Cut onions lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick wedges, leaving root ends intact. Place onions in 15×10-inch glass baking dish. Pour 1 cup vinaigrette over onions, coating evenly. Let marinate 3 hours. Chill remaining dressing. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill onions.)
Prepare barbecue (medium-high-heat) or preheat broiler. Sprinkle onions with salt and pepper. Grill or broil onions until golden. turning occasionally, about 12 minutes. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature.)
Place spinach in large bowl. Toss with enough vinaigrette to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Fill radicchio leaves with spinach. Top with grilled onions. Pass remaining dressing separately.

Bon Appétit
June 1996

*Sandy recommends a couple of ways to enjoy a variety of the veggies in these two meals:

Green Soup:  http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/basic_green_soup.html

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for garnish
  • 2 large yellow onions, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 2 tablespoons plus 3 cups water, divided
  • 1/4 cup arborio rice
  • 1 bunch green chard (about 1 pound)
  • 14 cups gently packed spinach (about 12 ounces), any tough stems trimmed
  • 4 cups vegetable broth, store-bought or homemade
  • Big pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, or more to taste

PREPARATION

  1. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over high heat. Add onions and 1/4 teaspoon salt; cook, stirring frequently, until the onions begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, add 2 tablespoons water and cover. Cook, stirring frequently until the pan cools down, and then occasionally, always covering the pan again, until the onions are greatly reduced and have a deep caramel color, 25 to 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, combine the remaining 3 cups water and 3/4 teaspoon salt in a soup pot or Dutch oven; add rice. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer, cover and cook for 15 minutes. Trim the white ribs out of the chard (save for another use, such as to add to a stir-fry or other soup). Coarsely chop the chard greens and spinach.
  3. When the rice has cooked for 15 minutes, stir in the chard greens. Return to a simmer; cover and cook for 10 minutes. When the onions are caramelized, stir a little of the simmering liquid into them; add them to the rice along with the spinach, broth and cayenne. Return to a simmer, cover and cook, stirring once, until the spinach is tender but still bright green, about 5 minutes more.
  4. Puree the soup in the pot with an immersion blender until perfectly smooth or in a regular blender in batches (return it to the pot). Stir in 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Taste and add more lemon juice, if desired. Garnish each bowl of soup with a drizzle of olive oil.

TIPS & NOTES

  • Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 4 (omitting the lemon), cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days. Season with lemon just before serving.

Also, I found another twist on the recipe that looks good:

http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2011/10/06/take-a-chance-on-green-soup-that-is/

*Sandy turned our harvest of beans, potatoes, eggs and romaine plus a few things from the store into a Salad Nicoise.  This looks so yummy I am going to make it for dinner!

Salad Niçoise (pronounced nee-suaz) is essentially a French composed salad, much like our American Cobb salad, but with tuna, green beans, and potatoes, instead of chicken, bacon, and avocado. Salad Niçoise hails from Nice, on the Mediterranean Sea, though like so many foods we enjoy here of French origin, has changed a bit to adapt to our tastes. According to the Wikipedia the Niçoise salads are always made with raw vegetables and served with anchovies. Nicoise salads that are served in America are typically served on a bed of lettuce and include cooked green beans and potatoes. According to our Paris insider, the Niçoise salads there are all made with canned tuna. Depending on the establishment here, I’ve had them either with canned or with freshly grilled tuna. Like its American Cobb salad cousin, the Salad Nicoise takes some time to prepare, given all of the ingredients. This is one dish where setting up your mise en place (all ingredients chopped and ready to go) will help the salad come together smoothly.

Recipe from Simply Recipes:

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/nicoise_salad/

From Epicurious.com:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Salade-Ni-oise-15533

Enjoy the summer bounty,

Terri

p.s.  Tillie, our farm dog,  LOVES veggies.  Her favorite snack is a fresh green bean.  When she hears a green bean snap, she comes running.  Also, she loves the vegetable broth that I make from all the extra greens, stems, and cuttings poured over her dog food.  She even enjoyed the carrot soup.  We found the perfect dog for Bee Branch Farm.  We are lucky!

Wild Ramps, Milk Snake and Honey Bees at Bee Branch Farm

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Our Bee Branch Farm hike was full of discoveries on this lovely spring day.  Native wildflowers blanketed the forest floor, and we enjoyed the fresh earthiness of wild ramps plucked from the rich soil.  Landon found his first native milk snake, and Tillie loved “the hunt.”  Upon return home, we watched as Glenn transferred our two new nucs of mountain bees to their hives.  They are busy making their home on Bee Branch Farm.  It was a beautiful day shared with friends.

Wild turkeys, fresh eggs and lost honey bees

The wild turkeys are enjoying our buckwheat, and Glenn sees our chances of the buckwheat reseeding itself being gobbled away ; the flock of 30+  are grazing daily and taunting Tillie on our morning walks.  Glenn and Tillie have informed them not too push their luck too far or one of them might be the lucky bird  to be marinated in bourbon and apple cider and roasted to a golden brown next Thanksgiving.

Our hens have finally slowed down egg production, but we are still getting two eggs a day which is fine from the five hens.   They were thankful for the   cornbread dressing that they received after Thanksgiving, and I am thankful for the fresh eggs that definitely make a more delicious quiche.

On a sad note, we lost our yellow hive of honey bees; we are still analyzing the evidence, but it looks potentially  like colony collapse disorder.  This hive was always weaker from the start, but we had left all their honey in the hive in the hope that they would be able to survive the winter and gain strength going into next year.  We had seen a lot of bee activity during the sunny days when we looked out at their hives, but upon closer inspection, Glenn realized that those were robber bees enjoying all the yummy honey.  It seems that they had a Thanksgiving feast as well.

City cousin comes for a farm visit

 

City cousin, Ali, came for a visit to see her country cousin, Tillie.

Gallery

Chicken Coop on the move

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Our movable chicken coop is now ready to host a few laying hens; we are looking forward to yummy, fresh eggs. Glenn designed this movable chicken coop so that we can move it throughout the garden to provide food for … Continue reading

Tillie, our fearless hike leader

We adopted Tillie last year, and she is a great addition to our farm family.  She loves adventures,  especially hikes that include her finding box turtles for us.